The Secret Nazi Missions In The Beskidy Mountains

First Published: June 8, 2018 Last updated: July 28th, 2018 Written by Marcus Lowth Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes

It is no secret that behind the brute force of the Nazi war machine was a group of individuals with an active interest in the locating and obtaining of ancient relics. Furthermore, this small group at the very top of the Third Reich sought out long-forgotten esoteric knowledge. Further still, they sought the holders of this knowledge, a race they believed they would discover in the inner-Earth.

Nazi Beskidy Mountains

Whether the Hollow Earth theory is true or not is open to debate. And as preposterous as it might sound to some, there are some very intriguing and scientifically backed-up theories regarding an environment with its own ecosystem existing miles upon miles beneath our feet within the planet. Those in charge of the Third Reich certainly thought so. We have written before of the secret Nazi activities in Antarctica and such facilities as Base 211, for example. In the very early days of the Polish invasion, however, the region where the Beskidy Mountains lay was home to a secret Nazi mission. At least according to author Robert K. Lesniakiewicz. This mission, it is claimed, was to mine for valuable materials, but also one of seeking an entrance, to the inner world of the Earth.

Poland Falls, September 1939

The main regions around the Beskidy Mountains, Jordanow, and Zakopane, would fall to the Nazis in the first days of the war around 6th September 1939. However, rather than leave German military forces in charge of the area, the SS would take direct command. And they did so right up until January 1945 when Soviet Forces liberated it from their control.

The fact that such a high level of command retained direct control of an otherwise seemingly unimportant region would draw the suspicion of conspiracy researchers following the war. One such researcher was the aforementioned Lesniakiewicz. In the early-1990s, he would speak to several of the surviving soldiers from the Polish “Homeland Army”. These units had fought and resisted the German military until the Soviet liberation. They claimed to have information regarding the activities of the SS in the mountain region.

According to the soldiers, the bunkers and specialized facilities in the area were built by local peasants who had been rounded up and placed in labor camps by Nazi soldiers. Some of the local population who were not sent to the death camps are also said to have worked here.

The SS would personally guard and maintain these labor camps in and around the Beskidy Mountains. And, according to Lesniakiewicz, Heinrich Himmler would spend considerable time in the Jordanow region throughout the war.

The Uranium Oxide Mines and Wonder Weapons

In April 1940, the first of several active uranium oxide mines would open in the Jordanow region. These mining projects would continue until November 1944. The area was also a place where the SS would test some of their top-secret aircraft and “wonder weapons”.

These would include the V-3 Rocket, as well as an apparent “super-cannon” that could fire projectiles up to ten-feet long to around 30-miles called “Tausendfussler”. The ultimate objective was to reach London with strikes from Mimoyeques, in France. These attacks never became a reality. Other rumors existed about saucer-shaped technology. And slightly to the south of the region is Der Riese, the alleged site of the Nazi Bell.

Whether any uranium was present in the region is debatable. The Nazis were engaged in uranium mining in Norway until mid-1943. An Allied bombing mission would eventually destroy that facility. Had such an operation have been taking place at Jordanow, it is probable a similar attempt would have been made to destroy it. Unless of course, such a plant didn’t exist and was a cover for other missions.

Labor Camo

Agharta – The “Underground World

According to reports from witnesses at the time, Himmler would often lead missions into the mountain regions around Jordanow directly. Many believed it was the local legends of the region that held his, and the SS’s fascination.

According to the legends, on the southwestern slope of Mount Babia Gora, which sits on the border with Slovakia, is an entrance that leads to the inner-Earth, or the “Underground World”. This entrance is called Agharta, or some refer to it as Interterra. Secret Nazi missions took place right the way throughout the mountain region. Several alone would head to the Domica-Baradla Cave seeking an entrance inside the Earth.

Several other cave systems were also subject to extensive explorations. It is highly doubtful that Himmler found what he sought. And if he did, given the SS presence right up until the Soviet’s recapturing of the area, perhaps it is now buried deep within a former-Soviet KGB file. Pure speculation of course. It certainly appears, however, that Himmler’s interest in the region (an interest he perhaps introduced upon the Third Reich) went back several decades to when he was a young boy.

An Interest Going Back Decades?

Once again, while it is pure speculation, it is quite possible that Himmler’s interest in the inner world hidden somewhere in the Beskidy Mountains may stretch back to 1913 when he was a 13-year-old boy. He was “on a tour” of Austria-Hungary with his family to celebrate an appointment of his father, Dr. Gebhard Himmler. Part of this trip would see the young Himmler in the Zakopane region (near the Beskidy Mountains) at the same time as noted occultist and Masonic expert (possibly a Mason himself), Dr. Friedrich Wichtl.

Witchtl was in the area visiting an artist’s and writer’s colony just south of Jordanow. His interest in the colony is likely due to the well-known legends of the mountain regions. In fact, given the secret societies in Germany at the time, such belief in an inner world and a “super race” of extraterrestrial entities who called it home was more widespread than some might think. It is highly likely, given the status and social circles Dr. Himmler and Dr. Wichtl would have shared that they may have spent time speaking of such notions.

Wichtl would go on to write a book entitled ‘World Freemasonry, World Revolution, World Republic’ several years later in 1918. The young Himmler, now 18-years-old, would read the works from cover to cover while recovering from a serious illness the following year, while training as a military cadet. Whether it would plant the seed that would lead Himmler and the Nazis in search of other-worldly relics and legends in the Beskidy Mountains is open to debate. They certainly appear to have had an intense interest in this region. As intense an interest, it would seem, as they had in the occult, and esoteric relics and knowledge. And of using both to contact extraterrestrial civilizations.

About Marcus Lowth

Marcus Lowth is a writer with a love for anything interesting, from UFOs, aliens, and the Ancient Astronaut Theory, to the paranormal, general conspiracies and unsolved mysteries. He also has a passion for film, music, and the NFL. As well as writing for various websites, he runs and writes for Me Time For The Mind.

Marcus has written a total of 369 articles for UFO Insight. You can contact Marcus via email.

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